Small Retailers and Package Stores Need Your Support On Question #3

In our latest Advisor Magazine, we included a campaign ad produced by the 21st Century Alcohol Retail Reform Committee outlining why you should vote yes on question #3. The video explains that locally owned package stores, independent markets and convenience stores initiated the ballot question. Not only will voting yes help save Massachusetts small retailers and package stores, but it will support consumer convenience, public safety, and tourism. 

Visit https://www.yeson3mass.com/ for more information on how you can support this campaign!

To read the full article – check out The Advisor Magazine – Issue 21.

 

Why Vote YES on Question 3

According to the 21st Century Alcohol Retail Reform Committee, voting YES on Question #3 will allow for the safe and convenient expansion of alcohol sales. Question #3 will:

1. Promote Consumer Convenience 

Progressively increase the number of allowed beer and wine licenses from 9 to 18, minus any full liquor licenses owned. The number of full liquor licenses will be set at 7.

2. Promote Public Safety

Prohibit self-checkout of alcohol and change the fine for selling to a minor applicable to gross sales rather than just for alcohol.

3. Promote Tourism

Allowing valid out-of-state IDs to be relied upon by a retailer will increase access to alcohol in a reasonable and responsible way.

There are many ways you can help promote the Vote YES campaign, including making a donation to the “21st Century Alcohol Retail Reform Committee”; adding the “Vote Yes on 3” logo to the end of your email signature, your store newsletters, and/or website (by copying & pasting the logo); placing “Vote Yes on 3” signs in your store’s window, etc.

To learn more about what you can do to support this campaign, please visit:

https://www.masspack.org/Ballot-Initiative

To read the full article – check out The Advisor Magazine – Issue 20.

 

 

Time To Spread The Work – Ballot Question Update

Saving The 3 Tier Alcohol System

A highly anticipated debate in Massachusetts is preparing to finalize a decision on November 8, 2022, after votes are made on ballot question #3.

Ballot question #3 concerns off-premise alcoholic beverage retailers and the number of licenses that an entity is allowed to hold. Voting YES will allow entities to ultimately hold eighteen beer and wine licenses, an increase from the nine currently allowed. (This increase will be gradual.) Voting YES will also decrease the number of full liquor licenses from nine to seven. Ultimately, a YES vote will help restore balance in the off-premise retail industry.

 

Voting YES on ballot question #3 will not only support consumer demand and promote equal opportunity for all retailers, but it will also help save local businesses by preventing big corporations from dominating the market. Voting YES will further assist local businesses and better public safety by prohibiting self-checkout of alcoholic beverages and establishing a fine for selling to a minor applicable to the total amount of purchases, rather than just for the alcohol purchased.

Voting YES will aid in expanding tourism and increasing the customer base in Massachusetts to allow retailers to accept out-of-state IDs, as we are currently the only state that does not force retailers to reasonably rely on valid out-of-state IDs.

Liquor License Advisor encourages you to vote YES to not only support local business but also to increase the demand for your license, as well as increase the return on your investment over time. We support our clients and business models that we’ve helped establish over the years, and it’s important to us that you are successful. Reach out to us any time with questions. We’re here for you.

To read the full article – check out The Advisor Magazine – Issue 19.

 

 

Time For Nine

Grandfathering Off Premise Licenses

November 8, 2022 is a date that all liquor store owners should have circled on their calendar as a lot rides on the outcome of a proposed ballot question for 21st Century Alcohol Reform bill.

Most recently, more than 19,000 signatures from the public were filed in support of the reform, which over time would gradually increase the current number of licenses available to a single retailer from 9 to 18 by 2031.

Why is the number 9 so important?

As previously mentioned in Retail Tier Reform: Looming 21st Century Alcohol Changes in Issue #17 of The Advisor, the license cap for the sale of all alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, and liquor under the same license) would be reduced from 9 to 7. Retailers will be allowed more licenses overall; however, the cap for all alcoholic licenses will be lower.

For retailers who are currently near or wanting to capture the 9 license limit, they will have to pick up licenses quickly and start now.

With the cap increasing and the quota remaining the same, simple economics of supply and demand suggest that anyone who has a controlling interest in multiple stores, specifically those with all alcoholic licenses will greatly benefit.

For successful retail owners with great ambitions of increasing their capacity, this is not a time to “wait and see”. Your climb to nine licenses has to start now while there’s still time to get them under agreement.

Waiting around on the sidelines to see what happens won’t work and in fact will be too late. If you need a plan, we’re here for you. Call us any time at 781-319-9800.

To read the full article – check out The Advisor Magazine – Issue 18.

 

 

The Advisor Magazine: Issue #18 –

No signs of stopping for the battle growing on both sides on controversial liquor license issues across the state.
In Issue #18 of The Advisor we discuss:
In this issue, we take a look at both on and off-premise issues getting ready to boil over.
Click Here To Read The Advisor – Issue #18.

 

The Advisor Magazine: Issue #17 –

As we settle in for Independence Day there’s much to celebrate even with looming changes to both on and off-premise liquor licenses.
In Issue #17 of The Advisor we discuss more on-premise liquor licenses coming to the City of Boston, retail Tier Reform, Summer drinking trends and more!
In this issue, we take a look at what’s to come going into Q3 of 2022.
Click Here To Read The Advisor – Issue #17.

 

20 Years In The Boston & Massachusetts Liquor License Business

What’s Next?

Twenty years is a long time to reflect back on and recall some incredible stories!

Some of the main characters who influenced my career path include Howard Deering Johnson, Donnie Wahlberg, Charlie Perkins, and of course, Dick Newcomb, my Father and original creator/owner of the Mug ‘n Muffin restaurants.

Our original family restaurant business started in 1965 in Wollaston, Massachusetts, the birthplace of one of America’s best-known restaurant chains, Howard Johnson’s (HoJo’s). My Dad’s new restaurant, named Mug ‘n Muffin, was opened in July 1965, only 1.5 years after I was born, so I was essentially born into the family business. Even as a young kid, I was involved as my Dad grew his business, which had evolved to 26 restaurants by the early 1980’s.

I grew up flipping eggs and burgers at my family’s restaurant, and before I was old enough to do that, I watched guys like Bobby Orr and other decorated Boston Bruins stop in for coffee, as one of the main restaurants was conveniently located across from the old Garden. Over the years, I watched my Dad negotiate with vendors and landlords and I now realize that I was getting a front-row seat to a real-life masterclass in influence before I was old enough to drive. I knew I wanted to be a restaurant owner and run my Dad’s business.

After I graduated college in 1986, we re-developed the concept, worked hard, and I was able to grow from two to four restaurants that I managed for the family. A lot of work and stress brought a lifestyle I didn’t want to maintain as my own family grew.

Ironically, my Dad’s restaurant was a regular host to AA groups, and I’ve been sober since March 28, 1988.

 

To see how the next 20 something years go – check out The Advisor Magazine – Issue 16.

 

 

The Advisor Magazine: Issue #16 –

The power struggle continues and things heat up in the retail tier of the liquor license industry. With being approx. 6 months away from the Senate vote on the 21st Century Alcohol Reform bill, many storylines are surfacing.

In Issue #16 of The Advisor we discuss what comes after 20 years in the liquor license industry, which pre-mixed liquor is taking over, the end of revitalization and more.

In this issue, we take a hard look at what’s to come for all stakeholders involved in off premise and on premise alcohol bills.
Click Here To Read The Advisor – Issue #16.

 

More Towns Banning Nips & Miniatures In Liquor Stores

Quincy may be the latest Massachusetts town to ban the sale of nips, according to a March 31 Patriot Ledger report. Mayor Thomas Koch has expressed interest in asking the city’s licensing board to ban the sale of nips (alcoholic beverages in containers 100 milliliters or less) to control littering and waterway pollution, as well as address other problems, such as trash-lined streets, debris in storm drains and contaminating ocean water.

Koch also believes that nips make it more difficult for restaurants and other establishments to control underage drinking. Koch has reportedly given this decision time, as the pandemic has already hit many businesses hard.

Quincy would follow five other Massachusetts towns that have already banned nips: Chelsea, Mashpee, Falmouth, Wareham (to go into effect 5/11/22) and Newton (to go into effect 6/30/22).

Also interesting to note is that a Rhode Island legislator has proposed a law that would ban nips statewide.

The question is: Will some businesses be able to make up the revenue if nips and miniature bottles are removed?

 

For more articles on the liquor industry – check out The Advisor Magazine – Issue 15.

 

 

The Advisor Magazine: Issue #15 –

Controversy rising in both the off-premise and on-premise liquor industry is creating a ripple across the state.

In Issue #15 of The Advisor we discuss Sommeliers pushing the boundaries, north end Boston outdoor dining fines for restaurants, cocktails-to-go extended, again, banning of nips and miniatures in more towns, and more!

In this issue, we take a hard look at what’s to come for all stakeholders involved.
Click Here To Read The Advisor – Issue #15.

 

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